sf // california academy of sciences

California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

If you’ve ever used Blogger as a platform, you’ve likely experienced the same unfortunate thing that happened to me a few days ago: I had an entire, well written post all typed out and ready to publish, and when I came home, I opened my laptop and realized I had left that same entry open - except it was blank. The blank draft then automatically saved itself, basically erasing everything I had worked so hard on (OK, it wasn't that bad...). Note to Google: Is there even a Blogger department in your company anymore? The platform doesn't look like it's been updated since 2002. All this to say, the automatic draft saver is both a blessing and a curse. I'll be more careful in the future.

So here's take two of this entry. Who knows - maybe it'll even be better than the first!

After a lazy Saturday spent eating my bowl of granola while watching Project Runway - one of my favorite alternatives to the original Netflix & Chill pairing - I finally make it out of the house. I walk along Mission St. and stop by Goodwill, a cool consignment store called Carousel and Fabric Outlet, a crafting mecca at which I purchase embroidery materials for some exciting new projects I have planned.

I then hop onto the 49 bus and switch to the 7 upon reaching Market St. The 7 conveniently drops me off on 9th Avenue, right by an entrance to the Golden Gate Park, from which it takes less than five minutes to get to the California Academy of Sciences. Thanks to the ridiculous Segway tourists dangerously rolling around, it actually takes me ten. I'm surprised these things are even more successful than Google Glass. Perhaps Segway riders are just huge Arrested Development fans.

The California Academy of Sciences is free for Mission and Castro residents today, so I simply need to show ID and a piece of mail to get in (merci beaucoup, Target).

The first exhibit I visit is the earthquake simulator. This short and fun experience manages to make earthquakes exciting, which, in retrospect, is probably not what its creators were aiming for.

I then quickly walk through the upward spiraling rain forest, which I have a hard time fully enjoying with the thick cable-knit sweater I have on. Also, the over-sized butterflies in there are a little too comfortable around humans for my taste...

California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Rainforest California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco


An elevator at the top of the rain forest takes visitors all the way down to the lower level aquarium, containing hundreds of big and small tanks. This is where I get to see my favorite part of the entire museum: the corals. Fish are great and all, but corals are where it's at. I can't decide whether it's because of their texture, movement or exquisitely bright colors, but I love corals. They make me want to walk right up to the greasy, children-finger glass of their tank and ask them to be my friends. Really.

The planetarium is currently closed for renovations, but out of sheer luck I'm able to attend a screening of 3D Universe, a twenty minute immersive film that takes viewers across space. A live narrator explains the different scales of the universe, from planet Earth to the known edges of the cosmos. Despite greatly enjoying the film, I find all these planets, suns, galaxies and light years very daunting, and leave the theater feeling a bit of an existential crisis. But as our presenter reminds us in his final words, at the end of the day we are as much a part of the universe as anything we have just seen, so there's no reason to be intimidated. I still prefer to avoid thinking about space unless it's absolutely necessary.

Lastly, I climb a final flight of stairs and arrive at the Living Roof. In addition to solar panels, the roof hosts over 1.7 million plants, making it a prized hangout spot for birds, insects and other critters. It also allows for a great view of the deYoung Museum and Golden Gate Park, though it's so bright you may have to squint. How cool would it be to have a living roof on my (future) tiny home? I don't think I could be 1.7 million plants, though. Nor would I want flocks of birds shitting all around my house and insects creeping into my windows. So maybe it's not the best idea, actually.

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco 

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Aquarium at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Living Roof at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

Living Roof at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco

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