sequim + seattle

Llamas in Sequim

As we load the car with our suitcases and ready ourselves to check out, dad calls out: “I think there are llamas!” We have have a slight obsession with alpacas, and llamas are somewhat similar, so to me they’re equally exciting. Olympe rushes to the fence, and I quickly follow with the camera. I’m not sure whether llamas actually spit when they’re upset, but this fact was ingrained into my brain from a young age (I frequently read Tintin as I child) and I keep a distance from them, just to be safe. I don’t really know why anyone would own llamas in Sequim, but yet again, I never wondered by Napoleon Dynamite owns a llama either.

Llama in Sequim

Llama in Sequim



Barn in Sequim


For brunch, we pick the first café we spot in Sequim, and we quickly realize we’ve definitely made the right choice. Sunshine Café is filled with locals drinking coffee, reading the paper or catching each other up on the latest town news. Our waitress is very friendly, as is the manager (and perhaps owner) of the diner. I’m very surprised to find mom deviating from her usual diner order (tuna melt), though to be fair I’ve never seen her ordering one for brunch. Starting the day off with tuna salad may be somewhat of an acquired taste. Instead, mom gets the waffle special ($9), Olympe gets a short stack of pancakes that actually ends up feeding the entire table ($8), dad gets the corned beef hash ($12) and I get an egg salad sandwich with a heapful of sweet potato fries ($7). Yum. We are unanimously pleased with our meal.

Sunshine Café in Sequim

When we ask the owner for directions to Marymere Falls, everyone in Sunshine Café pitches in. Some patrons write the name down for us, others pull out their phones and googled their location...it is pretty heartwarming to see how helpful and kind people can be. After thanking everyone for their contribution, we drive past Port Angeles and arrive at Lake Crescent. From the lake, we take the trail to Marymere Falls. The entire trail is 1.8 miles roundtrip, but we are short on time so we decide to turn back after the first waterfall (I’m estimating we went about 1/2-2/3 of the way). Some of the trees are so large, you could probably fit ten people huddled together in a disk and that still wouldn't cover the entire trunks' surface. I can’t quite pinpoint why, but this forest has a different feel from Mount Tabor. To this day, I still can’t pick a favorite between the two!




























Some more driving in the opposite direction leads us to Bainbridge Island, from which we take the ferry to Seattle. The ferry ride is only about 30 minutes long, which is just enough time for you to get a view of the approaching Seattle skyline. We’ve been really lucky so far, because we’ve always had something nice to see during sunset. If you snoop around the boat, you’ll find an area where there are plenty of Seattle guides and pamphlets up for grabs. This will give you a good sense of what the different neighborhoods are, where to eat and shop, and what to do in this new city.










Once ashore in Seattle, we venture inside Ye Olde Curiosity, a shop full of abnormal taxidermy, skeletons and other strange relics, as well as some good old Seattle souvenirs and a few prank materials. It’s too late to do anything else, but before checking into the hotel we do get to see the ferris wheel lit up, which is not an unpleasant sight.

Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in Seattle

Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in Seattle


Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in Seattle

Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in Seattle

At 6:30pm, we arrive at Marcela’s Creole Cookery, where we are to take a cooking class. Our chef and instructor Anthony, who hails from New Orleans himself, introduces us to our fellow culinary students (there are 13 of us total). The girls at the table beside us have already finished a bottle of wine, and we quickly learn they are best friends, and one of them is married to the other’s ex-husband. They’re hilarious.

Though the entire class is not hands on, Anthony does make sure each person is called upon to help out at least once. Sadly, mom is summoned twice, but only to serve! It’s a shame she doesn’t get to put her skills to use! Here is the menu:

Shrimp Gumbo
Créole Garlic Shrimp Crostini
Shrimp Etouffée
Bread Pudding with Whiskey Sauce

We are able to taste each dish after it is ready. I could care less for the gumbo, which we all agree is much too salty. However, the shrimp crostini (entirely prepared by Olympe, actually!) is scrumptious. There are definitely at least two cups of garlic in those things (not really, though, so don’t go throwing two cups of garlic into your pan at home). The shrimp étouffée is like a good version of the gumbo, and I like it as well.

By the end of the evening, our two charming neighbors are completely drunk, which only makes them funnier than they already were. While this may not have been the best cooking class we’ve ever taken in terms of food and instruction, it’s perhaps the one I’m least likely to forget.

Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle


Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle

Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle

Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle

Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle

Marcela’s Creole Cookery in Seattle

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